The Street Essay Topics Ann Petry

Interpret 13.02.2020

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The protagonist, Lutie Johnson has three barriers dragging her down. She is not only a woman, but a black woman that is also a lower class single mother. In the novel Lutie faces the realities of the American Dream, which for African- Americans is literally just a dream. Johnson is a black male struggling with racism and societal pressures. Johnson faces many challenges. As one reads, one cannot help but feel his anger, frustration and tenseness. She is white and was living in a neighbourhood where the majority of the people were black. Anyhow, Ann Petry when through her childhood without any prejudices against racial difference. It was only later that she encountered racism. Then, she studied and became a pharmacist but in , she decided to move in Harlem with her husband and to write. From Mr. It is this pattern which has Lutie surviving in constant fear and thinly repressed anger, robbing her of her safety at home and opportunity throughout her life. Unable to find companionship based on terms of mutual respect and affection, she has little choice but to isolate herself emotionally after the collapse of her marriage. This alienation, coupled with an escalating culture of violence, ultimately plays a critical role in pushing Lutie towards her most life-altering decision of the novel: the brutal murder of Boots Smith. Much of her ill-fortune begins after her husband is unable to find work, no matter how hard he searches. In times of economic hardship, white men were given obvious preferential treatment in the quality of work, as well as availability. Even when African-Americans were tenacious, and lucky, enough to find work, the work was degrading, humiliating. In the case of Boots Smith, he could not even pursue a career as a pianist without having to be constantly wary of violent abuse at the hands of a white police force. In a country run on the backs of dollar bills, to intentionally hold back an entire race of people is not only indicative of a truly disgusting sense of superiority and entitlement, but is also incredibly harmful to society over the long term. As we see Lutie struggle from one low-paying, demeaning job to the next, we see her own faith and personal character be beaten down bit by bit. Petry gives her readers an opportunity to place themselves into the position of the main character, Lutie Johnson. Lutie is an African-American woman and a single mother. The gender and race are the key factors of her position in the book. Lutie attempts to do her best in providing the finest life she could for herself, and her son, despite the fact that she has to face all the difficulties that life tosses on her way. Lutie is introduced into the novel not only in terms of the racism issue; she is also discriminated and is a subject of sexism. In order to provide the life that she wants for herself and Bub, the woman has to make some very significant decisions. The challenges, ups and downs, which are faced by Lutie, are also felt by her son. Lutie Johnson struggles to see through her walls of oppression in form of forced submission to a white male-dominating society. The home of Lutie and her son, Bub Johnson, shows the contradiction against the image of the public home.

The aspects of race and gender, though they are only made obstacles due to tragically backward social norms and systemic inequality, become further and further internalized over the course of the novel. The perceptions of Lutie as an adult woman, both sexually and socially, range from the inappropriate to the predatory.

However, she encounters challenges every step of the way, such as the men who want to exploit her sexually before they could extend any help. Examples include Boots Smith who wants to have sex with her before passing her on to Junto, who also intends to have sex with her before giving her the money she needs for a lawyer, to represent her son, Bub. The setting symbolizes the limited opportunities that the characters have to a better life. The subway creates the image of overcrowding, tight space, and lack of freedom to move freely. Lutie Johnson has to fight her way out of poverty, but the burdens she has to deal with are too much for her. Moreover, the darkness common in underground tunnels suggests a bleak future for the characters. Her future is hopeless because she is a murderer running away from the law. Similarly, the butcher sells stale meat, but the customers have no option since there are no alternatives. This symbolizes the lack of better alternative jobs to improve their lives. Consequently, men and women keep walking along the street because they have nothing better to do. Jones is a Super at the apartment where Lutie stays, who at some point worked as a Navy officer. Additionally, Jones also worked as a night watchman. One of the key values that Jones portrays is lust. This is indicated by his open lust for Lutie who was a single parent. The theme that desperate times call for desperate measures. For instance, both the excerpts have evidence that proves these themes through the characters. My mother would say you might as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb," McCourt 9. The characters seem like they would not have much, if anything, in common. This alienation, coupled with an escalating culture of violence, ultimately plays a critical role in pushing Lutie towards her most life-altering decision of the novel: the brutal murder of Boots Smith. Much of her ill-fortune begins after her husband is unable to find work, no matter how hard he searches. In times of economic hardship, white men were given obvious preferential treatment in the quality of work, as well as availability. Even when African-Americans were tenacious, and lucky, enough to find work, the work was degrading, humiliating. In the case of Boots Smith, he could not even pursue a career as a pianist without having to be constantly wary of violent abuse at the hands of a white police force. In a country run on the backs of dollar bills, to intentionally hold back an entire race of people is not only indicative of a truly disgusting sense of superiority and entitlement, but is also incredibly harmful to society over the long term. As we see Lutie struggle from one low-paying, demeaning job to the next, we see her own faith and personal character be beaten down bit by bit. The setting of this novel is Harlem in the s. The story deals with the life and trials of the Mulatto woman Lutie Johnson and her struggle to find a place in this environment for herself and her son. Hence, The Street is also concerned with different aspects of urban life. In the following analysis, we will primarily deal with the last chapters of the novel and in particular with the end of the novel, which shows Lutie Johnson leaving Harlem and moving to Chicago. On the one hand, we will be concerned with the reasons and motifs why Lutie is disillusioned and finally leaves Harlem.

Though it may seem a resentful overstatement, the behavior of the topics, street or otherwise, around her gives the impression of a more literal translation. From Mr. Ann is this pattern which the Lutie surviving in constant fear and thinly repressed anger, robbing her of her safety at home and essay throughout her life.

The street essay topics ann petry

One of the key values that Jones portrays is lust. This is indicated by his essay lust for Lutie the was ann street parent. He feels that he is in topic love with Lutie even without her consent.

He lusts for Lutie each time he sets his eyes on her and feels that he could have her. More so, he is a very lonely man.

The street essay topics ann petry

Jones tries to seek a companion, but does not succeed in his mission. This implies that he leads a lonely life without anyone to support him effectively in his life according to his wishes.

Hence, The Street is also concerned with different aspects of urban life. In the following analysis, we will primarily deal with the last chapters of the novel and in particular with the end of the novel, which shows Lutie Johnson leaving Harlem and moving to Chicago. On the one hand, we will be concerned with the reasons and motifs why Lutie is disillusioned and finally leaves Harlem. The Street takes us on a journey that helps us experience the dynamics of poverty and understand the thought processes of people trapped in it. The first chapter introduces us to the character Lutie Johnson who is trying to create a stable life for her and her son. In chapter 18, the novel develops the theme of lust. Junato and Boots exhibit lustful feelings toward Lutie who was a single parent. Junto calls Lutie and informs her that he has an important visitor whom she must meet. The visitor in this case was Boots who ultimately requests Junto to move out and come out later. He tries to force Lutie into a sexual engagement by kissing and touching her. He also promises Junto that he would have his own share later on hence emphasizing the theme of lust. This ends tragically when Lutie hits Boots to death and escapes. The theme is significant because it brings out the different types of divisions and feelings existing in society such as racial distinctions, and perspectives that men hold toward women in society. This theme is also significant to the overall plot because it promotes effective understanding of the entire story in connection to racial feelings among different characters. Subsequently, she cannot be engaged into the well-paying job due to her race; she only earns insufficient wages in exchange for the hard labor. Therefore, the walls, which separate the hostile black society from the advantaged white society, are already smothering her even before she relocates into her new home. In the novel, even her ideas are preoccupied with the threats levied on her day after day. After Lutie and Bub transfer into the th Street apartment, they find that the walls that make up the rooms are missing in the square footage. In a country run on the backs of dollar bills, to intentionally hold back an entire race of people is not only indicative of a truly disgusting sense of superiority and entitlement, but is also incredibly harmful to society over the long term. As we see Lutie struggle from one low-paying, demeaning job to the next, we see her own faith and personal character be beaten down bit by bit. It is the tragedy of young Bub Johnson, and the choices his mother was mercilessly driven to make, that is truly the most poignant condemnation of racial and gender inequality within the novel. Forced to work for such low pay that she must work late into the evening, merely to afford a tiny apartment in a crime-ridden neighborhood, Lutie struggles to raise her son away from corrupting influences. However, the anger and frustration she constantly carries with her surfaces in ways which are confusing and frightening for her son. She began by writing short stories and poems that exposed the treat of racism The final setting, Shiloh, works well to highlight the battles of war to the battles between Norma Jean and Leroy. Throughout the story Mason is focused on the persistency of grief, the instability of gender roles, along with the distance and lack of communication separating Leroy and Norma Jean from each other Many people look to African, and African American literature to gain knowledge about the African American culture. The true culture and image often goes unseen, or is tarnished because writers who have no true insight or experience, have proceeded to write about things in which they are uneducated..

This drives him into lustful essays about Lutie. The key thing that Jones reveals that other characters do not do is continuous engagement in evil streets. As one reads, one cannot topic the feel his ann, frustration and tenseness.

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She is white and was living in a neighbourhood where the majority of the people were black. Anyhow, Ann Petry when through her childhood without any prejudices against racial difference.

The Street Essay Topics & Writing Assignments

Ann was only later the she encountered racism. Then, she studied and became a pharmacist but inshe decided to move in Harlem with her topic and to write. Subsequently, she cannot be engaged into the well-paying job due to her essay she only earns insufficient wages in exchange for the street labor.

Therefore, the walls, which separate the hostile black society from the advantaged white society, are already smothering her even before she relocates into her new home. In the novel, even her ideas are preoccupied with the threats levied on her day after day. After Lutie and Bub transfer into the th Street apartment, they find that the walls that make up the rooms are missing in the square footage.

Boots is a mean person. To cage a human being as if they were an animal is crime enough; but the consequence of a human being that has been made to believe they truly are one is even darker, and impossible to truly measure, count, or comprehend. For instance, her hatred of the odor in the school she teaches develops the theme of race in the novel because it indicates her heightened racial feelings toward children at the school. This image of closing perfectly demonstrates the condition of the fighting African-American race, hardly able to have enough money for the unacceptable housing in the slums of Harlem; thus, being locked into their depressed state by walls that detach them from the opportunities. Subsequently, she cannot be engaged into the well-paying job due to her race; she only earns insufficient wages in exchange for the hard labor. The protagonist, Lutie Johnson has three barriers dragging her down. Though it may seem a resentful overstatement, the behavior of the men, white or otherwise, around her gives the impression of a more literal translation. She decided that she was going to be a poet at the age of

In Angela's Ashes Frank McCourt show how poverty affects people's ann by showing actions Frank McCourt committed in the essay due to topic, such as stealing food. A lesson in a street or story that is not directly stated in the book.

"The Street" by Ann Petry

Thus, she becomes enraged the street feels homicidal hatred against her environment: She leaned further against the essay, seemed almost ann into it, and started to cry. The hall was full of the sound. The thin walls echoed and re-echoed with it two, three floors below and one floor topic.